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More than 200 educators from Sonoma County attended an in-depth school safety conference on Thursday, Sept. 26.
More than 200 educators from Sonoma County attended an in-depth school safety conference on Thursday, Sept. 26.

SCOE & Sheriff's Office Partner
Host Safe Schools Conference

In-depth training provides tools
to Sonoma County schools to prepare for and mitigate violence 

Sep 27, 2019

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More than 200 educators from Sonoma County attended an in-depth school safety conference on Thursday, Sept. 26. The event was hosted by theSonoma County Office of Education (SCOE), in partnership with theSonoma County Sheriff’s Office.

Attendees included individuals from nearly every aspect of the educational system, including teachers, school office staff, school resource officers, superintendents, and more.
Attendees included individuals from nearly every aspect of the educational system, including teachers, school office staff, school resource officers, superintendents, and more. The training covered multiple facets of school safety, from how to foster social-emotional learning and positive school climate as prevention measures, to how to work with law enforcement in the event of an active shooter, to how to save lives in an emergency.

SCOE hosted the conference as a follow-up to a School Violence Preparedness & Response training that was coordinated along with the Sheriff’s Office last fall. More than 300 educators attended the 2018 training over the course of two sessions, and the response was overwhelmingly positive. 

SCOE hosted the conference as a follow-up to a School Violence Preparedness & Response training that was coordinated along with the Sheriff’s Office

“More than ever, we are hearing from educators that they wish to have the tools and resources to be prepared to respond to an act of violence on their campus,” said Steve Herrington, Sonoma County Superintendent of Schools. “We hope that this training can both help schools build safe, positive school cultures, as well as save lives and minimize harm should the unthinkable occur.”  

“As a parent, I understand that school safety weighs heavily on the minds of students, parents, and educators.  We expect our kids to be safe at school.  Our training helps educators have the tools needed to keep kids as safe as possible if an active shooter situation occurs,” said Sheriff Mark Essick.

 

This year’s day-long conference began with introductions by Herrington, District Attorney Jill Ravitch, and Assistant Sheriff Jim Naugle. 

The Sheriff’s Office then led a session on emergency planning and response, which included information from a number of county agencies. A session on school site safety featured the perspectives of school resource officers from several Sonoma County schools. Gary Sigrist, a nationally known speaker, consultant, author, and expert on emergency preparedness, then provided information on social-emotional safety and how positive school climate can be used to prevent acts of violence.

The conference concluded with a presentation on Stop the Bleed, which provides educators with life-saving techniques they can use in the event of a violent attack on campus. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVij7f6Brgo

Stop the Bleed Tourniquet Training at the Safe Schools Conference.

A representative from St. Joseph's Health was on hand to provide each school site that attended with at least one trauma kit, which can be used to help staff "stop the bleed."

While this training was specifically for educators, the Sheriff’s Office recommended that families and community members stay informed by signing up for emergency alerts at:

www.nixle.com,socoalert.org, and following the Sheriff’s Office onFacebook (@sonoma.sheriff).

Community members can empower themselves by watching the six-minute "Run. Hide. Fight." video about how to survive an active shooter. The video is available in English and Spanish. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=jvwna1DaV_g

https://www.fbi.gov/about/partnerships/office-of-partner-engagement/active-shooter-resources/responding-to-an-active-shooter-crisis-situation

Contacts: 

Sonoma County Office of Education: Jamie Hansen, Communications Director  jhansen@scoe.org  | 707-524-2620

Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office: Misti Wood, Community Engagement Liaison Misti.Wood@sonoma-county.org  | 707-565-3941

All SCOE news items can be found here. General media inquiries can be directed to Jamie Hansen at  jhansen@scoe.org . 

 


Northwestern University safety training:
"Run, Hide, Fight"

Active Violence

An active violence incident involves an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area. The individual may be armed with a firearm or bladed weapon or may in engage in other violent acts such as driving a vehicle into a crowd. There may or may not be a pattern or method to their selection of victims.

In addition to reading the procedures below, you are encouraged to watch this video that presents information on how to respond to an active shooter situation. Note: The following video contains violent content to educate and prepare someone to deal with an active aggressor.  Viewer discretion is advised.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=jvwna1DaV_g 

This training video on the “Run, Hide, Fight” safety protocol shows students, faculty and staff

Before an incident occurs

  • Don’t assume it will never happen.
  • Be aware of your surroundings at all times along with any possible dangers.
  • Know where all of the exits in your area are located.
  • Determine whether the space you are in can be locked.
  • Know your exact workplace address including the office number.
  • Have an escape plan, same as in a fire.

Discuss with colleagues the plan you would enact in an incident, such as exits, sheltering in place, securing doors, and assembly points.The phrase "Run, Hide, Fight ®" is a registered trademark of the City of Houston. 

When an incident occurs

Run

  • Take decisive action if you hear gunshots—don't wait until others tell you to act.
  • Know your surroundings—have an escape route and plan in mind.
  • Run and call 911 from a cell or campus phone when it's safe to do so. 
  • Help others if you can, but keep moving. 
  • When calling 911, be sure to provide an exact location—don't assume a dispatcher knows where you are located.

Hide

  • If you can't run, hide as a second option. 
  • Do not huddle together, as it makes one easy target.
  • Lock and/or use items to barricade doors, shut off lights.
  • Put your cell phone on silent and call 911, but do not speak loudly to avoid being heard. 
  • Keep others calm around you. 

Fight

  • As a last resort, when running and hiding are not an option, fight when your life is in imminent danger. 
  • Assume a survival mindset and know that active violence situations are often over in a few minutes.
  • Find an object to use as a weapon—fire extinguisher, chair, book bag, letter opener, etc.
  • Develop a plan with others to take out a potential shooter—be decisive and commit to action.

What should I tell the 911 operator?

Don’t assume someone else is calling 911. If you have specific information and have made it out safely, call the police.

  • Be specific about the location where the incident is occurring—for example, “There is an active shooter on the campus of Northwestern University, first floor of Norris Center.”
  • Provide a specific description of those involved, including clothing and weapons.
  • Pre-program your cell phone with your school's emergency number

What should I expect when police officers arrive?

  • Remain calm and be prepared to show your hands to arriving police officers.
  • Do not slow down responding officers. Follow their instructions and keep moving.
  • Do advise them where the suspects may be in the building.

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